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News, knowledge, and insights for the automotive industry.

Richard Cordray Stepping Down As Head Of U.S. Consumer Protection Agency

Richard Cordray, the embattled director of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, announced Wednesday that he will leave the agency by the end of November. "I am confident that you will continue to move forward, nurture this institution we have built together, and maintain its essential value to the American public," Cordray wrote in an email to the agency's staff.

Arent Fox Secures Victory on Behalf of New York Maserati Dealers

New York, NY — Arent Fox LLP is pleased to announce the firm secured a favorable decision on behalf of three New York Maserati dealerships. On November 10, New York Administrative Law Judge Walter Zulkoski of the New York Department of Motor Vehicles ruled that both Maserati’s new proposed dealer agreement and its new Commercial Policy Bonus Program are prohibited and a direct violation of the state’s law.  

Self-Driving Trucks May Be Closer Than They Appear

Trucks will someday drive themselves out of warehouses and cruise down freeways without the aid of humans or even a driver’s cab — about that there seems little disagreement. The question is how soon that day gets here. And while the answers vary — technologists, not surprisingly, are more bullish than truckers — billions of dollars and a growing parade of companies, from tiny start-ups to the country’s biggest trucking operations, are betting it will be here sooner than most people think.

Autonomous cars likely to transport elderly, children in future

Self-driving cars will change millions of people’s lives for the better by providing independence and mobility to those who can’t drive because of physical limitations or age. The technology will allow more people to live on their own terms and participate in what the most of us consider everyday life. “Autonomy promises better mobility and safety for more people at a lower cost,” retired General Motors chief of R&D and strategic planning Larry Burns writes in the first issue of Autonomous Vehicle Engineering, a new publication by the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Wild West: Waymo Lets Go of the Wheel in Arizona

No driver, no driving, no problems (shoes and shirts required). Waymo has been testing its self-driving vehicles in Arizona since 2016, and the rollout of completely driverless cars in Chandler, Arizona now marks a major milestone for the technology and the company. Waymo intends to eventually expand fully driverless cars throughout the Phoenix area through using operators behind the wheel of some cars and mapping new areas of the metro to expand the range of the autonomous cars.

Lyft Wants to Be a Part of It, New York, New York

Is Silicon Skyline the next Silicon Valley or Silicon Beach? Lyft is opening a New York City office, and while the company did not confirm they would be bringing autonomous cars to NYC’s famous traffic, some of its engineers in the Big Apple will be working on self-driving technology. The company also noted that the diversity of New York’s neighborhoods and urban layout makes it an ideal place to test out its technology. Other employee focus areas will be infrastructure and marketplace efforts.  

Let's Talk Vehicle to Vehicle

That's the ask in a new a new, man to man letter. The ranking Democrat of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) sent the request to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget's Mick Mulvaney, urging him to act on rulemaking involving the standardization of vehicle to vehicle, or V2V, communication. A 2016 notice of proposed rulemaking  involved requiring dedicated short-range communications, or DSRC, that would be inter-operable in all new vehicles.

Automotive Practice Group Chair Speaks with the San Fernando Valley Business Journal

Automotive practice group chair, Aaron Jacoby recently spoke with San Fernando Valley Business Journal about several topics pertaining to autonomous vehicles, including how a small company located in Northridge, CA is developing a “black box” for the autonomous or driverless vehicle market.

NHTSA Prepares to Let Loose on Self-Driving Regs

Car safety regulations requiring human hands and feet may be getting the boot. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has asked industry players to share their feedback on “any unnecessary regulatory barriers to automated safety technologies.” The agency aims to “encourage innovation without reducing safety.” The effort follows actions taken by the Transportation Department and Congress to change safety demands on self-driving vehicle developers. Regulators are clearly indicating that there’s no foot needed to put the pedal to the metal.

Automakers Streamline and Save Today to Spend on Self-Driving Future

A couple million dollars saved is a few technology advancements earned. Identifying and reducing day-to-day costs on the traditional side of the automaker business is set to fund the more futuristic innovations in the industry. Focusing on strong performers in mass-market vehicles like trucks and sports-utility vehicles, companies like GM, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler recently reported strong earnings in their core business. These earnings are expected to be critical in financing efforts for electric and autonomous offerings.